October’s “Poem of the Month” is Here!

Miriam Sagan, Poet of the Month at The Drugstore Notebook

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  • oem-of-the-month-is-here/’>October’s “Poem of the Month” is Here!.

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  • Three Questions for Poet Donna Snyder from Miriam’s Well

    Thank you, Miriam Sagan, for including this interview of me in your series found at Miriam’s Well.

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    Miriam's Well: Poetry, Land Art, and Beyond

    Questions

    What is your personal/aesthetic relationship to the poetic line? That is, how do you understand it, use it, etc.

    Aside from childhood efforts, I began writing poetry in my early 30s, without any academic training. I was an obsessive lap swimmer, and my line length tended to be similar in length, read aloud as my natural breath. I soon became aware of the use of lines to emphasize specific words and images. Later, my line breaks began to signal both punctuation and continuation. My writing is innately rhythmic, likely influenced by performing my poetry with a band of musicians, artist, and performance poets from the West Texas/Northern Chihuahua/Southern New Mexico border region.

    Do you find a relationship between words and writing and the human body? Or between your writing and your body?

    The connection between my body and my poetry is multilayered. I tend to write in an uncalculated…

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    Miriam Sagan’s review of THE WOMAN WHO FELL TO EARTH: AN IMAGINED LIFE OF ANA MENDIETA by Diana Rico

    I love and respect Ana Mendieta and her art. Thank you, Miriam Sagan.

    Miriam's Well: Poetry, Land Art, and Beyond

    I was very intrigued to discover that fellow New Mexican writer Diana Rico was as fascinated by the work and life of Cuban-American artist Ana Mendieta as I was. This feminist artist was one of the first to create ritualist performance, imprinting the earth, often with her body, in a way that was both non-commercial and low impact in terms of the site.
    Her death, a fall from a Manhattan highrise, seems shockingly metaphoric in this context. I was cautioned by the women’s history professor who introduced me to Mendieta’s work to not confuse art and biography. This may be ideologically correct, but impossible for a poet.
    There is a long poem about Mendieta in my collection MAP OF THE LOST.
    And a section of Rico’s book below.

    HEADLINES

    The headlines screamed for weeks afterward. They finally quieted after two-plus years. The amount of time it would take for two…

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